Posted in GAP News, Mississippi Art News

The Lorax “Every Inkling Makes a Difference” Student Writing Contest

From our friends at HP:

HP and Scholastic have teamed up to host the “Every Inkling Makes a Difference” writing contest and learning center. The program is designed for parents and teachers to engage with students through the story of The Lorax, discussing responsible ways they can impact the world around them, spark creativity and allow them to tell their own inspiring story. This “learn, see, do” philosophy will help students take what they know from the story of The Lorax and apply it right in their own backyard.

Students from grades 3 to 8, who are public, private or home schoolers, can read The Lorax through Read Across America, see The Lorax in theatres today, and then visit the “Every Inkling Makes a Difference” website to participate in science-based lessons and create their own storybook about their personal environmental journey.  Once their storybook is created, students can enter it into a Scholastic contest to win a $10,000 scholarship from HP. The contest is open for entries through April 6.

As part of the contest, MagCloud has developed a Storybook tool for creating custom books using templates, characters and backgrounds from the movie The Lorax. Students are asked to write a story that describes one creative new idea for how they, their family, or their community could live more sustainably. They can register for the contest (with their parents’ permission) at the Scholastic website (www.scholastic.com/thelorax), and then access the Storybook tool directly at lorax.magcloud.com to create their book. Parents can then order copies of the books, which are printed on-demand through MagCloud, or download a digital PDF version for viewing on their PC or mobile device. The books will be printed using paper that is FSC-certified, acid-free and fully recyclable making it easy on consumers and the environment. HP will be donating $1 per book to the World Wildlife Fund supporting their efforts in Sumatra to protect the habitat of the proboscis monkey.

HP has also launched a program that empowers consumers to “Print Like The Lorax” – a reference to making more sustainable choices when printing. The program includes videos and educational content with practical tips on selecting printing products designed with the environment in mind, choosing papers certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and recycling used cartridges through the HP Planet Partners program.

Additionally, HP will be enabling access to Lorax-themed content via a new printer app and widget as well as on www.hp.com/create. This content includes coloring pages, puzzles and other family activities that are infused with eco-friendly tips.

To find out more about all of HP’s programs related to The Lorax movie premier visit  www.hp.com/go/Lorax.

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Posted in GAP News, Mississippi Art News

Student Contest | Celebrate 2011 by Writing Raps About the Year’s News – NYTimes.com

TODAY IS THE DEADLINE TO ENTER: Do your students want to be rappers when they grow up? Here is a fun contest through the New York Times and Flocabulary!

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Each December, we take a look back at the year’s big news with quizzes, teaching ideas and a roundup of links to interesting retrospectives around the Web. And since we’re big fans, every year we link to Flocabulary’s Year in Rap.

Flocabulary is an online learning platform that features educational songs, videos and resources for grades K-12. For the last two years, Flocabulary has created a Year in Rap as a supplement to its popular Week in Rap, which is produced in partnership with Channel One News.

This year we thought it would be fun to formally collaborate with them and offer a contest in which students are invited to write lyrics for their own mini “Years in Rap.” Since Flocabulary is in the business of using rap for teaching and learning, they were enthusiastic — and even offered to provide a lesson plan to guide teachers or students new to composing in rhyme.

Below, you’ll find the contest rules, the lesson plan and a rubric to show what we’ll be looking for in the lyrics your students post. The contest deadline is Jan. 6.

Meanwhile, Flocabulary will release its 2011 edition of the Year in Rap on Dec. 16 and we’ll feature it right here on the Learning Network. So remember to tune in!

Read the full article and see all the contest rules at Student Contest | Celebrate 2011 by Writing Raps About the Year’s News – NYTimes.com.

Posted in GAP News, Mississippi Art News

Student Contest | Celebrate 2011 by Writing Raps About the Year’s News – NYTimes.com

Do your students want to be rappers when they grow up? Here is a fun contest through the New York Times and Flocabulary!

—–

Each December, we take a look back at the year’s big news with quizzes, teaching ideas and a roundup of links to interesting retrospectives around the Web. And since we’re big fans, every year we link to Flocabulary’s Year in Rap.

Flocabulary is an online learning platform that features educational songs, videos and resources for grades K-12. For the last two years, Flocabulary has created a Year in Rap as a supplement to its popular Week in Rap, which is produced in partnership with Channel One News.

This year we thought it would be fun to formally collaborate with them and offer a contest in which students are invited to write lyrics for their own mini “Years in Rap.” Since Flocabulary is in the business of using rap for teaching and learning, they were enthusiastic — and even offered to provide a lesson plan to guide teachers or students new to composing in rhyme.

Below, you’ll find the contest rules, the lesson plan and a rubric to show what we’ll be looking for in the lyrics your students post. The contest deadline is Jan. 6.

Meanwhile, Flocabulary will release its 2011 edition of the Year in Rap on Dec. 16 and we’ll feature it right here on the Learning Network. So remember to tune in!

Read the full article and see all the contest rules at Student Contest | Celebrate 2011 by Writing Raps About the Year’s News – NYTimes.com.